Ammo storage per state.

I noticed a few people are confused about ammo storage requirements, I thought I would start this thread. If people can contribute - please do.

Factual, please.

Ammo storage by state - Victoria.

  • Ammunition must be stored separately to firearm.
  • Ammunition must be stored in a lockable container.
  • A lockable safe compartment is allowed.

As an example:

Ammunition can be stored in either one of these compartments, as long as:

  • it’s locked.
  • there are no firearms stored in that compartment.

Ammo can also be stored in a separate lockable container. For example, a filing cabinet, a toolbox, a surplus ammo can, a shop bought (e.g. MTM) ammo can.

As long as the container is locked (i.e. locked with a lock, not locked as in closed) and does not have firearms, i.e. ammo only, you are within your legal obligations.

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Ammo storage by state - NSW

NSW is fairly similar to VIC.

Because i am lazy here is the link :slight_smile:

https://www.police.nsw.gov.au/_data/assets/pdf_file/0015/131154/Ammunition_Safe_Storage-_FACT_Sheet.pdf

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This is great info, I’ve seen a lot of peeps that are under the impression you cannot used ammo cans or tool boxes. I’ve also seen folks new to firearms buy actual safes, because the guy at the gun shop said too.

Yep, exactly that!

I had to educate my local policeman who thought it had to locked up in a bolted down safe same as guns.

A post was split to a new topic: Specific requirements for propellent storage?

When you started this thread and it had the propellant storage mentioned also I started having a look through the Act and the regulations.

Is the Storage of cartridge ammunition actually in either. I couldn’t seem to find reference to its storage more about what you could have with respect to different licenses. Offenses and penalty units. This is regarding Victoria only. What you have posted is only a Police publication.

Ammo storage by state - QLD

Here’s the quick quote for Qld which says basically anything locked is ok. The long version’s in the link which says the same thing.

You must store the SAA (small arms ammunition) in a secured area in a separate area from firearms (with different locks and different keys or combinations), unless you’re authorised to do so under the Weapons Act 1990. A secured area might include a drawer, cabinet, cupboard, room or other enclosure that’s locked when no one is around

https://www.qld.gov.au/emergency/safety/explosives-fireworks/explosives/collecting-ammunition/storing-ammunition

A post was merged into an existing topic: Specific requirements for propellent storage?

I’d like to make this factual for the ‘howto’ section, i.e. with references, examples and links. That is, I will trim random discussion later. Links, examples, exerts are appreciated.

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This is useful. It caused me to go back and double check the requirements for the state I live in. In my case I thought the requirements for storing ammunition was actually more stringent that it is. would only reload as much ammo as the compartment above the main safe could hold, but as it turns out I can lock my metal cupboard and still be legal. In fact given the regulations state “A secured area might include a drawer, cabinet, cupboard, room or other enclosure that’s locked when no one is around.” I could actually leave it on my bench…not that I would recommend it as they would probably ping me in an audit as my wife and kids have access to the shed key…interesting none the less…good post

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@1Fatman, @JizzFlinger missing WA and NT here.

I have no idea except to say that when I had a safe inspection done because I had more than five guns a few years back, the officers noticed I had a smaller safe (Spika S3) and they asked if there were any guns in that. I said no, I use it to store ammo and parts. They asked if they could have a look, so I did and they saw I had it like chock full to the point of 357s flooding out of it when I opened the door. “I buy in bulk to save money” I said. They looked at each other and gave me a copy of the paper work and alls good so far.

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In Western Australia ammunition is to be stored in basically the same way as a firearm.

The provisions of Regulation 11A(1) of the Firearms Regulations 1974 apply in respect of security storage.

"A person entitled to possess firearms or ammunition of any kind is to ensure that the firearms or ammunition are stored in accordance with this regulation.

Firearms and ammunition are to be stored in a locked cabinet or container that at least meets the specifications described in Schedule 4 or in such other way as is approved".

https://www.police.wa.gov.au/Site/Links/Firearms-Regulations-1974--Schedule-4

1. Construction

Specifications for storage cabinets or containers

  • The cabinet or container is to be constructed of mild steel that is 2 mm thick.
  • A joint between 2 faces that is butt welded is to have a continuous weld along the full length of the joint.
  • A joint where the edge of one face is folded over the edge of another face is to be stitch welded, with welds of at least 20 mm in length at intervals of not more than 100 mm between welds.
  • Spot welding is not to be used on the joints between faces.
  • The cabinet or container is to be so designed that no firearm or ammunition within it can be removed from it while it is locked.
  • In this clause - ‘face’ means a side, the top, or the bottom, of the cabinet or container.
2. Doors
  • Doors are to be recessed into the surrounding frame with margins of not more than 4 mm.
  • Each edge of the door and door frame is to be internally supported and have a return of at least 10 mm.
  • The cabinet or container is to have an internal stop of at least 10 mm against which each edge of the door, other than the hinged edge, closes.
  • The supports and stops required by subclauses (2) and (3) are to be welded at the corners.
3. Hinging mechanisms
  • Hinge protection is to be provided in such a way that, if the hinges are removed, the door of the cabinet or container remains in place and locked.
  • If the hinged edge of the door is not longer than 1 metre, 2 hinges are required on it, and if it is longer than 1 metre, an additional hinge is required for each additional 500 mm or part thereof.
  • If 2 hinges are required, the distance between them is to be not less than one-third of the length of the hinged edge.
  • If more than 2 hinges are required the distance between adjacent hinges is to be the same and that is also to be the distance from each of the outermost hinges to the nearest end of the hinged edge.
  • If a spindle is used instead of hinges, it is to extend the full length of the hinged edge of the door and is to be attached to the door by welds the number and placement of which comply with the requirements of subclauses (2), (3), and (4) for the number and placement of hinges.
  • If, instead of using hinges, the door swings on a spindle or on pivots not extending the full length of the hinged edge of the door, the cabinet or container is to incorporate a return protecting the hinged edge, along its full length, against the use of a jemmy.
4. Locks and locking points
  • If the swinging edge of the door is not longer than 500 mm, one lock is required with a locking point half way along that edge.
  • If the swinging edge is longer than 500 mm but not longer than 1.5 metres —

a) 2 locks are required each with a separate locking point along the swinging edge; and
b) the distance between the 2 locking points is to be not less than one-third of the length of the swinging edge.

  • If the swinging edge is longer than 1.5 metres —

a) for each additional 500 mm or part thereof there is to be an additional lock with a separate locking point along the swinging edge; and
b) the distance between adjacent locking points is to be the same and that is also to be the distance from each of the outermost locking points to the nearest end of the swinging edge.

  • It is sufficient compliance with subclause (2) if, when the swinging edge is longer than 500 mm but not longer than 1.5 metres, there is one lock with at least 3 separate locking points.
  • Each lock is to have a 5 pin mechanism that deadlocks the bolt in the locked position until it is properly unlocked.
  • If the locking bolt is designed to be released by a handle or lever, the design is to be such that, if the handle or lever is forcibly removed while the door is locked, the bolt remains in the locked position.
  • The cabinet or container is to be fitted with a protective structure to guard against the forcible removal of any lock.
  • In this clause —

" locking point " means the point at which the bolt locks the door to the cabinet or container, preventing the door from opening;
" swinging edge " means the edge of the door opposite the hinged edge.

5. Anchoring
  • The cabinet or container is to be securely anchored from the inside at 2 points on each of 2 separate surfaces to 2 immovable structural surfaces by means of 8 mm x 75 mm masonry fixing bolts or coach screws, as is appropriate.
  • At each anchor point the cabinet or container is to be reinforced with a 40 mm x 40 mm x 2 mm metal plate, or a 40 mm x 2 mm metal washer, fitted between the surface of the cabinet or container and the head of the bolt or coach screw.